Tag: crossfit scoring

Kate is Great (Interview with our Director of Operations)

If you have ever worked with us to plan an event anytime recently, there is a good chance you have worked closely with Kate. She came on board back in February 2016, and her responsibilities have evolved to the point that she’s now a co-owner in the business and our Director of Operations. She’s done a tremendous job of keeping things moving (look no further than some of our awesome Facebook Reviews). and we are incredibly lucky to have her as part of the team. Without further adieu: A Q&A with Kate. (She is great!)

How long have you been CrossFitting?
My husband and I wandered into the 9AM Hopper at CrossFit Cool Springs on Saturday, May 24, 2014. The owner invited us to come back for a “workout and community cook-out” on Monday, and we thought that sounded fun. Of course anyone in the CrossFit community stateside knows what that means – and our second CrossFit workout ever was “Memorial Day Murph.” We were either going to quit immediately or be hooked. It was the latter.

What are your most and least favorite movements or workouts?
I absolutely love double-unders, and I’m learning to love Olympic lifts. It’s really important to me to pursue excellent form in my training (Not always at competitions – that’s the time for speed). My love of Oly has increased as my capacity to lift more and lift well goes up. I loathe thrusters. I can’t stress this enough – they are just the worst. 17.5 was a very mixed bag for me.

What was your proudest moment as an athlete?
I am fiercely competitive by nature. Like, “I haven’t had any cavities but my husband has” competitive. I am also my own worst critic, and I’m not very good at positive self-talk. I recently competed on a team at Mayhem for Mustard Seed Ranch, and my team made it to the final. The whole day I felt like I was holding them back because I don’t have a strength, per se – I am not the strongest or the fastest. Leading into the final, my teammates lead me to have a total breakthrough. They basically had to look me straight in the face and tell me that I’m consistent and well-rounded, and my lack of strength IS my strength because I am steady across the board. They also picked me to go last on the waterfall final, and we won that event. I don’t think I’ve ever been prouder of something fitness related.


Kate Clean

Do you have any game-day rituals?
Great music, witty banter, and a bag of Twizzlers for fuel.

What’s in your gear bag?
A shorter question would be “What isn’t in my gear bag?” I have so much stuff. My staples that you can pretty much find with me at any point are my Reebok legacy lifters, Nike Metcons (I usually like the Men’s colors way better), Rogue Grips, several clean pairs of low-rise socks, and a rope or two. I love my RPM rope, but I just got a Momentum Rope in the mail – literally yesterday. It’s a brand-new rope with a never-come-undone design and I’m excited to give it a spin.

On to professional life – How did you get to this point in your career?
I was running operations for a department at a major automobile headquarters here in the states, and I was beyond miserable. (Cue the video montage reel with my realization that money doesn’t equal happiness, and my eventual liberation from corporate America.) Around that time I reached out to the Throwdowns.com owner, who I knew from my gym, and I also got my L1 and started to coach. The rest is history. Taking care of our customers from start to finish is THE most important thing to me, and that value is what enabled me to rise from a standard account manager to the Director of Operations with an ownership stake in the business. I can truly say that I love what I do.

What is the best part about working for Throwdowns.com?
All the amazing, fitness-minded people all over the world who I am blessed to interact with. You make this fun.

What one thing do you wish event-planners knew?
We have seen it all, so take advantage of that and use us for our knowledge, not just our software! Some of our most successful competitions have involved us in things like workout planning, strategies for maximizing donations, and generally acting as consultants rather than just the registration and scoring provider. And we love doing it.

What are your interests outside of Functional Fitness?
In my free time, you can generally find me with my husband and our army of fur babies. We have three dogs and two cats, plus the occasional foster animal. I love spending time on the water – waterskiing, tubing and kayaking are my favorite. I’ve had tacos 4 times this week (if my nutritionist is reading this, it fit my plan!!), so you could say I’m interested in those. I also really like podcasts. My favorites are Girls Gone Wod, This American Life, Stuff You Should Know and Ask Me Another.

Anything else you want readers to know about you?
I have an identity crisis. My legal first name is Louisa, and just about everyone in real life calls me Weezy, but I introduce myself as my middle name – Kate – because it just feels too strange to introduce myself as “Weezy”. You can call me whatever you wish; I will answer to them all!!

 

Photography taken by The Barbell Spin

How to Read the Leaderboards

CrossFit competitions typically involve one of two possible scoring policies: placement-based scoring or scoring based upon points tables. This post briefly explains the difference between these two types of scoring policies.

Most CrossFit competitions tend to use a points-based scoring policy. With placement-based scoring, an athlete’s overall score at any point in the competition is the sum of their rankings. For example, if an athlete were to place 1st, 3rd, and 2nd across three workouts, they’d accumulate a total of 6 points. With placement based-scoring, athletes place higher on the leaderboards by placing higher across workouts and accumulating as few points as possible.

Although most competitions prefer placement-based scoring, some competitions, including the CrossFit Games, prefer points-based scoring policies. With a points-based system, a table pre-defines the number of points that are awarded for each placement in a competition, and the tables are designed so that athletes receive more points for ranking higher in workouts. Thus, with points-based scoring, athletes aim to accumulate as many points as possible. The points tables themselves are typically computed with non-linear formulas such that athletes who place consistently place higher receive are rewarded proportionally.