Tag: competition staff

Tips for Making Your Heat Schedule

A heat schedule is a must-have for a well-run competition.

If you want to have a smooth competition, a heat schedule is absolutely essential. A heat schedule helps keep you on the clock. It keeps your athletes and judges informed about when they need to be ready. And a timeline ensures that you have “go-times” for volunteers who are doing things like equipment changeover. *Check out this post for more information on how many volunteers you need at your competition.*

While it is critical to have a heat schedule, your standard “this is the order in which athletes signed up” timeline might miss the mark. Take a tip from regionals and the games: heats organized by ability level make for a more exciting competition day.

There are a few ways to approach organizing your heats by likelihood of earning a spot on the podium.

  1. Now, you could do all the leg-work yourself and export the athletes’ performance in the Open. But that is a lot of unnecessary work, especially because the athletes can do the work for you. You can ask them to provide their region placement in the past Open as a registration question.
  2. Alternatively, you might consider running a qualifier workout. In this scenario, you would program a workout that is representative of the difficulty level of your event. Athletes would complete the workout and log their score by a certain date (with or without video submission – you choose), and you can make your heat schedule from there. You could also decide to have the qualifier score count towards their overall event placement, or wipe the slate clean and use it just as a heat scheduling tool. If you have a lot of athletes competing and your competition day timeline is stretched a bit thin, it might be very useful to have athletes complete one of the scored workouts beforehand. This can also be useful if the workout is longer and/or boring for your spectators to watch.
  3. A strategy that our friends at Lex Artis use is one we endorse and love. At the point of registration, they ask athletes to answer one additional question: “How likely is it, on a scale from 1 to 5, that you podium? (1 meaning very likely and 5 meaning just for fun).” Athletes typically know and are honest about their ability levels. And you’re happy, because they do the work for you!

Have you used another strategy to make your heat schedule? What worked? What didn’t? We’d love to hear about it.

Volunteers: how many do you really need?

Few things have the ability to derail your competition like a lack of volunteers. But how many do you really need?

That depends on the size of your competition. There are three basic categories your volunteers fall into:

  1. Executive Staff

    • You, the event admin, cannot be the point person for everything. You need a small but mighty team of staff that is knowledgeable and close to you. We recommend having a person in charge of each of the following:
      • Equipment – You need someone in charge of all the equipment rotations that need to go on throughout the day – someone your equipment-mover volunteers can look to for questions
      • Judges (a head judge) – You need someone in charge of all the Judges who can be a second pair of eyes on the competition floor. The Head Judge makes all the final calls in terms of good rep/no rep, so we recommend that your Head Judge is at the very least an L1 with some judging and/or coaching experience.
      • Scoring/Score entry – You need someone in charge of score entry who is computer-literate. It’s helpful to give this role to someone with a temperament that doesn’t mind dealing with (sometimes heated) questions from athletes. You might be tempted to give this role to anyone who doesn’t want to be a Judge, but we recommend being thoughtful with your choice!
      • “Volunteer Wrangler” – We recommend having someone as the point person for your volunteers, should any questions arise. This person can also handle things like food deliveries, shift changes, making sure volunteers are okay, etc. It would be helpful if this person is also your First Aid point-person, and someone who can jump in as a judge if there is a need.
  2. Judges

    • You need judges – you know that – but to ensure the longevity of your event, you need *good* judges. You can find more of our thoughts on selecting judges with appropriate qualifications here, however, for the purpose of this article, we want to focus on quantity.
      • How many judges you need depends on how many athletes or teams will be competing at once. If you are only running one event at a time, this is easy to figure out. If you are running multiple events in tandem, you have to do a bit of math. We recommend having a 1.5:1 judge to athlete-per-heat ratio. For example, this means that if you are running 10 athletes or teams at a time, you should have 15 judges. This allows judges to rotate in and out as they need breaks (bathroom, lunch, eye fatigue, injury, etc). It may also be helpful to schedule your judges in sections of the day. Having an option to volunteer for an AM judge, a PM judge or an All Day judge might just improve your signups in the event that folks have part-day conflicts.
  3. Support Staff

    • There are a few additional volunteers that don’t fall into the Judge or Executive Staff categories, but are nonetheless important to consider for your event:
      • Parking lot wizards – responsible for helping people park efficiently, but also keeping them out of banned spots (nobody wants to announce license plates over the loudspeaker).
      • Athlete Check-in Table – responsible for getting athletes checked in, waivers signed and swag bags received
      • Merch Table, if you are selling your own merchandise on-site.
      • First Aid Tech – You might not need it…. but if you do and there isn’t one, you’re in a world of trouble. Make sure you stack up on First Aid equipment, as well.
      • Gear Team – Responsible for changing out equipment based on the workout. How many, again, depends on how many athletes you have, and how many different WOD implements. Don’t expect your judges to tackle this unless you explicitly state it at sign-up.
      • A Lively Emcee
      • A D.J.