Competition Programming: Part Two – Practical Considerations

Competition Programming: Part Two - Practical Considerations

 

Continuing our series on competition programming, this post will cover a practical approach to narrowing down your options for your workouts. We’re assuming that your goal is to program for diversity, meaning you aren’t biasing programming towards anything in particular. By taking a look at these practical considerations, you can build a framework that will help you make smart decisions for your competition programming.

Read Part One in this series: Guiding Rules

Consideration 1: Equipment

Start with a detailed inventory of the equipment available to you. While it may seem obvious, you do need to keep in mind that you won’t be able to use anything you don’t already have. This can keep you in check and prevent you from getting carried away from the get-go. If you plan on purchasing equipment for the sake of your competition, double-check your budget to make sure that expense fits comfortably within your projected revenue.

 

Consideration 2: Space

Similar to equipment, the available space you have to work with will be an important factor in your programming. This will determine how many athletes can compete at a given time, which will dictate how much equipment you’ll need to accommodate those athletes. Your venue will also decide what types of movements will work safely in a competition setting.

 

Consideration 3: Athletes

Your competition may consist of individuals, partners, or teams, or maybe even a mix of all of these combinations. No matter the number of athletes competing per slot, we strongly encourage that you program your workouts so that only one person is working at a time. This reduces the demand for judges and makes scoring simpler, not to mention reduces chaos and makes for a better spectator experience.

 

With the above practical considerations in mind, now we can move onto the fun part: programming itself.

We recommend at least 3 workouts to be able to make a claim at testing fitness as defined by the sport of CrossFit. Depending on the length of your competition (single vs. multi-day), you may have the flexibility to include more. As always, consider your athletes safety. Too many events within a short time period can be counterproductive at best, dangerous at worst. (Read our post on maximizing scoring for more ideas on making the most of your events.)

There are 3 elements of diversity that you’ll need to vary in your programming: time domain, movement type, and skill level. You’ll want your competition to include a good mix of these factors. This means doing your best to design workouts of different lengths, with a range of different exercises, at varying degrees of difficulty. This is where the magic happens, but by this point in the process, you should have some good parameters to work with that can will help you decide how to combine these elements in the best way for your competition.

Broadly speaking, your competition programming can have 2 different designs for diversity: diversity within each event or diversity as a whole. Programming each workout to be a comprehensive test of fitness is more challenging, but could be considered a better method. On the other hand, it is simpler to design your competition where all the events taken together measure diversity, but it may end up biased if not executed properly. In either case, when you athletes leave, you want them to feel like they were truly tested by your programming.

 


Stay tuned for Part Three in the Throwdowns.com complete series on competition programing.