Month: September 2018

Competition Day: What to Tell Your Athletes Ahead of Time

It is crucial that you communicate competition-day logistics to your athletes before event day.

This sets you up for success and keeps your focus off of answering athlete questions throughout the day. We recommend sending your athletes an email with all the information they’ll need for competition day. We recommend sending this email 7-10 days before the competition.

Here are a few things you should tell your Athletes ahead of time:

  1. Where to park (or NOT park):

    It’s helpful to send a parking map with any all-clear or off-limits parking zones clearly marked. You might consider taking a screenshot of your venue from the Google Maps Satellite View and marking off the “Yes” and “No” zones to attach to the “Week of Competition” email. If there is a specific place you want them to set up their tents (or NOT set up their tents), you need to tell them that in advance as well.

  2. The Food Vendor Situation:

    Your athletes need to know if there will be food onsite, what that food will be, and if it will be free or available for purchase. If it’s available for purchase but has specific payment requirements (like Cash Only), be sure to indicate that as well.

  3. When they are working out:

    Your athletes need to know the heat schedule before competition day for several reasons. The first reason is food timing and knowing when/what they should plan to eat. The second reason is because it allows them to invite spectators without expecting them to be there all day and wait around. And the third reason is so they know how long they will have to rest and recover. Note: *Check out this post for tips to making a great heat schedule.*

  4. Special equipment needs:

    Most athletes will have a stocked bag of their preferred equipment. But it’s  still better to let folks know what they might encounter on competition day so they can pack their bag accordingly. For example, if Annie makes an appearance, you definitely want to give athletes a heads up that they will need a jump rope – especially if you didn’t publicize your workouts beforehand.

  5. Anything you DON’T want them to do:

    If there is something you don’t want athletes to do, you need to tell them. For example, if you don’t want athletes using the gym bathroom and instead want them to use the Port-O-Johns, you need to tell them.

  6. Waivers:

    Some competitions require athletes to print and sign their waivers ahead of time. If you’d like athletes to bring their waivers to the check-in table, that’s great! Just make sure you include a copy of the waiver and set the expectation in the week-of email.

  7. Check-in information:

    Include any details about when athlete check-in begins on competition day. You might include any details about what you need to check-in (for example, all team members must be present to check in, etc)

What other information do you send to athletes on competition week?

Tips for Making Your Heat Schedule

A heat schedule is a must-have for a well-run competition.

If you want to have a smooth competition, a heat schedule is absolutely essential. A heat schedule helps keep you on the clock. It keeps your athletes and judges informed about when they need to be ready. And a timeline ensures that you have “go-times” for volunteers who are doing things like equipment changeover. *Check out this post for more information on how many volunteers you need at your competition.*

While it is critical to have a heat schedule, your standard “this is the order in which athletes signed up” timeline might miss the mark. Take a tip from regionals and the games: heats organized by ability level make for a more exciting competition day.

There are a few ways to approach organizing your heats by likelihood of earning a spot on the podium.

  1. Now, you could do all the leg-work yourself and export the athletes’ performance in the Open. But that is a lot of unnecessary work, especially because the athletes can do the work for you. You can ask them to provide their region placement in the past Open as a registration question.
  2. Alternatively, you might consider running a qualifier workout. In this scenario, you would program a workout that is representative of the difficulty level of your event. Athletes would complete the workout and log their score by a certain date (with or without video submission – you choose), and you can make your heat schedule from there. You could also decide to have the qualifier score count towards their overall event placement, or wipe the slate clean and use it just as a heat scheduling tool. If you have a lot of athletes competing and your competition day timeline is stretched a bit thin, it might be very useful to have athletes complete one of the scored workouts beforehand. This can also be useful if the workout is longer and/or boring for your spectators to watch.
  3. A strategy that our friends at Lex Artis use is one we endorse and love. At the point of registration, they ask athletes to answer one additional question: “How likely is it, on a scale from 1 to 5, that you podium? (1 meaning very likely and 5 meaning just for fun).” Athletes typically know and are honest about their ability levels. And you’re happy, because they do the work for you!

Have you used another strategy to make your heat schedule? What worked? What didn’t? We’d love to hear about it.